The politics of the gospel is about women shouting on the pavement

We have seen over the last few weeks much press coverage of the archbishop of Canterbury’s editorial of the New Statesman in which he speaks out with concern that coalition government was moving through policies not voted for by the electorate.

The Daily Telegraph on the 16th June reported that Tony Baldry, the Second Church Estates Commissioner, said Tory MPs and ministers were “dismayed” and felt “monumentally misunderstood” after Dr Rowan Williams attacked the coalition last week.

Mr Baldry, who acts as the link between the Church of England and Parliament, likened Dr Williams to a woman who stands on the pavement outside the Palace of Westminster and shouts at MPs as they leave the building.

Tim Ross, The Daily Telegraph’s Social Affairs Editor, goes onto suggest that in a veiled warning, Mr Baldry appeared to suggest that the continued support of MPs for the historic right of Church of England bishops to sit in the House of Lords could be jeopardised by
further  political interventions.

I know that Politians would rather not have women standing on the pavement outside the alace of Westminster shouting at MPs as they leave the building, however, if an  administration fails to hear the concern of the electorate maybe we need more women speaking out.  The Archbishop of Canterbury was speaking on behave of not just women but also men who have a concerns that this administration is moving forward with policy initiatives which are dependent upon the voluntary sector filling the gaps left.

 

 

And those who believe that faith leaders should stay out of politics should take a look at the gospels – the Christian message has always been a political one.

Samaritan Woman At The Well – He Qi

 

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About Sarah Mullally

If you wanted a blog run by an experienced blogger look elsewhere - I am a beginner. I am a mum, Bishop, Dame and poor potter - welcome.
This entry was posted in Church of England, Government Policy, politics. Bookmark the permalink.

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